Discussion:
Uh, 1COW?... what happens when someone does this...
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Robert White
2014-10-22 19:41:10 UTC
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So I've been considering some NOCOW files (for VM disk images), but some
questions arose. IS there a "1COW" (copy on write only once) flag or are
the following operations dangerous or undefined?

(1) The page https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/FAQ (section "Can
copy-on-write be turned off for data blocks?") says "COW may still
happen if a snapshot is taken." Is that a "may" or a "will", e.g. if I
take a snapshot and then start the VM will the file in the snapshot
still be frozen or will it update as I alter the VM? Does the
read-only-or-not status of the snapshot matter in this outcome?

e.g. what does "may" mean in that section?

(2) If you copy a file using "cp --reflink" and the destination is in a
directory marked NOCOW, what happens? How about when the resultant file
is modified in place?

(3) when using a watever.qcow2 virtual machine image that does
copy-on-write in the VM (such as QEMU) is it better, worse, or a no-op
to have the NOCOW flag set on the file? All the advice on this matter I
can find in Google seems to be "VM images bad, but will be addressed
soon" and its old enough that I don't know if "soon" has come to pass.

It seems like there is a 1COW flag implicit somewhere.

Just curious.
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Hugo Mills
2014-10-22 19:54:06 UTC
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Post by Robert White
So I've been considering some NOCOW files (for VM disk images), but
some questions arose. IS there a "1COW" (copy on write only once)
flag or are the following operations dangerous or undefined?
(1) The page https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/FAQ (section
"Can copy-on-write be turned off for data blocks?") says "COW may
still happen if a snapshot is taken." Is that a "may" or a "will",
e.g. if I take a snapshot and then start the VM will the file in the
snapshot still be frozen or will it update as I alter the VM? Does
the read-only-or-not status of the snapshot matter in this outcome?
e.g. what does "may" mean in that section?
If you take a snapshot of something, then any write to that (the
original or the copy) will cause it to be CoWed once. Subsequent
writes to the same area of the same file will go back to nodatacow.
Post by Robert White
(2) If you copy a file using "cp --reflink" and the destination is
in a directory marked NOCOW, what happens? How about when the
resultant file is modified in place?
Same thing as above.
Post by Robert White
(3) when using a watever.qcow2 virtual machine image that does
copy-on-write in the VM (such as QEMU) is it better, worse, or a
no-op to have the NOCOW flag set on the file? All the advice on this
matter I can find in Google seems to be "VM images bad, but will be
addressed soon" and its old enough that I don't know if "soon" has
come to pass.
It seems like there is a 1COW flag implicit somewhere.
I wouldn't put it in those words, but yes, a single CoW operation
occurs on writes to data with nodatacow set.

Hugo.
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Duncan
2014-10-23 04:09:48 UTC
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Post by Robert White
So I've been considering some NOCOW files (for VM disk images), but some
questions arose. IS there a "1COW" (copy on write only once) flag or are
the following operations dangerous or undefined?
(1) The page https://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/FAQ (section "Can
copy-on-write be turned off for data blocks?") says "COW may still
happen if a snapshot is taken." Is that a "may" or a "will", e.g. if I
take a snapshot and then start the VM will the file in the snapshot
still be frozen or will it update as I alter the VM? Does the
read-only-or-not status of the snapshot matter in this outcome?
e.g. what does "may" mean in that section?
Hugo's correct, but I explain it (both to myself and to others) a bit
differently, here.

Consider, btrfs is by default COW (which as we know means copy-on-write)
based, and many of its more unique features, including snapshotting,
depend on that.

Conceptually, what a snapshot does is pretty simple. It simply locks the
current data version, along with its metadata, in-place.

Because btrfs is native copy-on-write, normal writes will leave the
existing version in place and will write the new version elsewhere. When
the write is completed and the updated version is safely in place, btrfs
will normally remove the old version, thereby freeing the space it took
to be used for something else.

What a snapshot does, then, is simply lock the existing copy in place --
when the COW-based update is written, instead of being deleted the old
copy still has a reference to it from the snapshot, so the old version is
left in place.

What's critical here is that it's always the NEW version that gets
written elsewhere -- the OLD version remains where it is, to be deleted
after the update if there's not a snapshot still referencing it and thus
locking it in place, to be kept if there's a snapshot (or reflink or some
other reference to the old version) still referencing it, so an attempt
to access that old version (via the snapshot/reflink/whatever) can still
return it.

Of course nocow turns some of these basic assumptions on their head, thus
forcing btrfs to break its normal operating rules in one way or another.

As above, first the no-snapshot case. The file is nocow, so each
successive version in-place replaces what was there before.

But what happens when a snapshot locks the current version in-place, and
the file is subsequently updated? Btrfs can't overwrite in-place because
that would break the viability of the snapshot, yet nocow says the file
MUST be rewritten in-place. The two rules now conflict and one or the
other of the two, snapshot locking old data in place, or nocow forcing
new data to be written to the same place, must be broken in ordered to
allow the other one to be honored.

Btrfs resolves this situation with your (OP/RW's) cow1 solution. In
ordered to avoid breaking snapshot integrity, the new data is written --
once -- to a new location. However, the file retains its nocow property
and since the new location is no longer constrained to remain as-is by
the snapshot, further updates to it will update the new location in-
place, just as they would have continued to update the old location in-
place, had the snapshot not forced moving to a new location in ordered to
keep the integrity of the snapshot.

Which altho a definite compromise, still rewrites in-place for the most
part, *AS LONG AS SNAPSHOTS AREN'T HAPPENING NEARLY AS FREQUENTLY AS DATA
UPDATES*.

Which is where things get tricky, when people are doing automated
snapshots as often as once a minute. Under that sort of snapshotting
condition, nocow is essentially useless, because in a continuously
updated file scenario, file updates are going to be forced to a new
location so often that the nocow might as well not be there at all.

Which plays havoc with VM image and database fragmentation, the very
reason one may have been attempting to nocow these files in the first
place.

So what to do? Three possible solutions:

1) For small files and larger ones where the update rate is quite slow
(say an update every 10 minutes or so, on average), btrfs' autodefrag
mount option can be very helpful, because it simply watches for
fragmenting writes and queues up the affected file for rewrite as a whole
unit, thereby defragging it.

But as soon as updates start coming in nearly as fast as the file can be
rewritten, either because the file is big and thus takes a decent amount
of time to rewrite, or because the updates are simply coming in too fast,
that relatively simple (from the user-side) solution breaks down. Rule
of thumb guidelines suggest files under 100 MiB should generally be
rewritten fast enough that autodefrag can keep up, while internal-rewrite-
pattern files over a gig will need some other solution. In practice, for
most uses a quarter gig is generally fine for autodefrag, while a half-
gig can be problematic if updates are coming too fast. In the quarter-to-
half-gig-range, it's use-case and hardware specific.

2) Put the larger (half-gig-plus) internal-rewrite-pattern files
(database and vm images being the most common examples) on a dedicated
subvolume, nocow them, and either don't snapshot it at all, using
conventional backups instead, or very strictly limit snapshots, say
manually, perhaps every month, so cow1 based fragmentation is extremely
tightly controlled.

Because snapshots stop at subvolume boundaries, the dedicated subvolume
for the nocow files lets you continue snapshotting the parent subvolume
as normal, since the complicating files are off in their own dedicated
subvolume.

This can work well for VMs and databases that aren't "live" 24/7, as
their downtime can be taken advantage of to do the conventional backups.

It does NOT work well if btrfs send is the backup mechanism, since that
requires read-only snapshots. Similarly, in production environments that
must be up 24/7, there's no down-time for the backups to take place,
leaving the possibility that the backup isn't a consistent-state capture.
=:^( For these cases, see #3.

3) For cases where routine snapshotting is unavoidable, either because
btrfs send is the preferred backup method, or because the files in
question are in-use and updated 24/7, leaving no chance to take a
consistent backup on a quiesced file...

Do the same dedicated subvolume thing with nocow files to limit
fragmentation to the extent possible, try to limit snapshotting to the
extent possible (say half-hour instead of per-minute, or per-day instead
of per-hour), and schedule a periodic btrfs defrag to deal with the
unavoidable fragmentation. Reports from people that have done this
suggest weekly or monthly defrags are often enough, and don't run
"forever", as long as fragmentation is already limited to the extent
possible using the above techniques.

Meanwhile, while for technical reasons as described above, btrfs
snapshotting and nocow don't work together perfectly, it's worth keeping
in mind that they're still better than the comparable options (basically
nothing comparable) you'd have on more conventional filesystems. What
alternatives would you have trying to do this same sort of thing on ext4
or xfs, for instance? On btrfs, you still have all them, PLUS you have
access to btrfs-specific features that while limited in some aspects, at
least give you /some/ options.

(The filesystem option most directly feature-comparable to btrfs, tho not
available as an option to me for non-technical reasons, is zfs. Of
course it's also far more mature than btrfs is at this point. But I'm
told it has its own negatives, including far higher/stricter memory
requirements for reliable operation than that required for btrfs. YMMV
however, as it's not an option for me so I've not checked into those
claims.)
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and if you use the program, he is your master." Richard Stallman

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